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Obama
11-10-2009, 04:59 AM
Martinez follows in proud tradition
Posted Nov. 8, 2009 at 10:39pm
By William Dettloff


It’s hard not to be happy for Sergio Martinez at the news that he will step in for the intractably infected Kelly Pavlik and face Paul Williams in December. If anyone deserves a big fight and a chance at boxing stardom it is Martinez, who seemed to appear out of nowhere when he dazzled against Alex Bunema and then Kermit Cintron.

If you haven’t seen Martinez in action, don’t be fooled by the perfect orthodontia and a smile that suggests long hours spent on tranquil beaches populated with admiring, thong-wearing super models. He may look like a pretty boy, but he can fight. It’s in his blood, after all. Though he lives in Spain, he was born in Argentina, which boasts a rich history of excellent prizefighters whose ranks Martinez aims to join.

There haven’t been a lot of legitimately great Argentine fighters; the rule seems to be when they are good, they are very good. But there have been many memorable ones. Here’s a rundown.

Carlos Monzon, World Middleweight Champion
We Remember Him: He went unbeaten over the last 13 years of his career, made 14 title defenses and retired world champion. What else do you want?
High Point: When he starched Italian hero Nino Benvenuti in 1970 to win the title.
Low Point: When Argentine courts convicted him of killing his common-law wife in 1989.
Postscript: Killed in car crash in 1995.

Victor Galindez, WBA Light Heavyweight Titleholder
Why We Remember Him: He was a bull-strong and clever belt holder whose globe-trotting title reign ended right before the division’s Golden Age.
High Point: When he stopped Len Hutchins in 13 rounds to win the vacant title in 1974.
Low Point: When the criminally under-talented Mike Rossman knocked him out and dethroned him in 1978.
Postscript: Killed in car crash in 1980.

Luis Angel Firpo, Heavyweight Contender
Why We Remember Him: He knocked Jack Dempsey out of the ring.
High Point: When he knocked Jack Dempsey out of the ring. Duh.
Low Point: When Dempsey climbed back into the ring and knocked him down like 117 times.
Postscript: Did you know he stopped Jess Willard in Willard’s last fight?

Pasqual Perez, World Flyweight Champion
Why We Remember Him: He’s one of the best flyweights ever and was the first Argentine to win a world title.
High Point: When he dethroned durable champ Yoshio Shirai in Shirai’s own backyard in 1954.
Low Point: When he realized he was 4-11 and was as big as he was ever going to get.
Postscript: Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Niccolino Locche, World Junior Welterweight Champion
Why We Remember Him: He was known alternately by his nickname "El Intocable" ("The Untouchable"), or the Argentine Willie Pep. Enough said.
High Point: When he so frustrated Takeshi Fuji in their title bout in 1968 that Fuji refused to come out for the 10th round.
Low Point: Losing the title to the ordinary Alfonso Frazier.
Postscript: Smoked cigarettes throughout his career and still lived until the age of 70. That’s called winning.

Juan Roldan, Middleweight Contender
Why We Remember Him: Because he tripped Marvin Hagler and almost knocked out Thomas Hearns.
High Point: When he stopped Frank “The Animal” Fletcher in the sixth round.
Low Point: When powder-puff puncher Michael Nunn stopped him in 1988.
Postscript: Was a middleweight Firpo.

Juan Coggi, WBA Junior Welterweight Titleholder
Why We Remember Him: Because the worst memories are often the hardest to forget.
High Point: Beating Patrizio Oliva for the title in 1987.
Low Point: When he was dethroned by the utterly forgettable Loreto Garza.
Postscript: Whatever he’s doing right now, you can bet it looks awkward.

Jorge Castro, WBA Middleweight Titleholder
Why We Remember Him: He has more wins -- 130 -- than Gary Shaw has chins.
High Point: His 1994 KO of John David Jackson, which was The Ring’s Fight of the Year.
Low Point: 2001 loss to Imamu Mayfield, possibly the worst cruiserweight in the history of 190-pound men.
Postscript: Is a huge star in Argentina, but, inexplicably, couldn’t get arrested in the U.S. if he tried.

Hugo Corro, Middleweight World Champion
Why We Remember Him: Because Vito Antuofermo beat him for the title and we all loved Vito.
High Point: When he managed somehow to twice beat the very good Rodrigo Valdez.
Low Point: When he decided to become a fighter.
Postscript: Died in 2007 of undisclosed causes.

Carlos Baldomir, Welterweight World Champion
Why We Remember Him: Because Emanuel Steward always calls him “Carlos Baltimore.”
High Point: When he upset Zab Judah for the title.
Low Point: When he didn’t land a punch on Floyd Mayweather Jr. in 12 rounds and wouldn’t have if they fought 100 more.
Postscript: Of course he’s fighting again. What did you expect?

Gregorio Peralta
Why We Remember Him: He was a very serviceable light heavyweight and heavyweight contender in the late 1960s and early ’70s.
High Point: Giving a scare to up-and-coming heavyweight George Foreman in 1970.
Low Point: Getting stopped in the 10th round by Foreman in their rematch.
Postscript: Is probably the only fighter in history to have lost to both Foreman and Willie Pastrano, who stopped Peralta on cuts in a 1964 light heavyweight title bout.

Pedro Lovell
Why We Remember Him: He was “Spider Rico” in the first “Rocky” movie in 1976.
High Point: When he passed the audition.
Low Point: When Ken Norton destroyed him in 1976.
Postscript: Reprized his role as Rico in “Rocky Balboa,” released in 2006.

Oscar Bonavena, Heavyweight contender
Why We Remember Him: He was Ringo!
High Point: When he gave a young Joe Frazier hell in 1966.
Low Point: When he made it into the 15th round with Muhammad Ali only to get stopped.
Postscript: Was shot and killed outside a whorehouse near Reno, Nevada in 1976.


Source: http://www.ringtv.com/blog/1298/martinez_follows_in_proud_tradition/

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Other Argentine Fighters Worth Mentioning:
Santos Benigno Laciar
Julio Cesar Vasquez

imported_Nothingman
01-09-2010, 04:41 PM
I was amazed when I stumbled upon this fighter that I never had heard his name before. His record is 75-5-2, he was the LWW champion 3 times and beat Frankie Randall, Jose Luis Ramirez (in his last fight), Harold Brazier and then 48-0 Patrizio Oliva. He made 10 title defences alltogether. Argentinian fighters sure don't get enough credit, apart from Monzon, who had to beat several big names before he became internationally famous.

Obama
01-12-2010, 07:25 PM
I was amazed when I stumbled upon this fighter that I never had heard his name before. His record is 75-5-2, he was the LWW champion 3 times and beat Frankie Randall, Jose Luis Ramirez (in his last fight), Harold Brazier and then 48-0 Patrizio Oliva. He made 10 title defences alltogether. Argentinian fighters sure don't get enough credit, apart from Monzon, who had to beat several big names before he became internationally famous.

I suggest you read the post listed above yours.

imported_Ningy
01-14-2010, 11:11 PM
Niccolino Locche, World Junior Welterweight Champion
Postscript: Smoked cigarettes throughout his career and still lived until the age of 70. That’s called winning.

or

Oscar Bonavena, Heavyweight contender
Was shot and killed outside a whorehouse near Reno, Nevada in 1976

of course I am being sarcastic, but I would take the whorehouse...

Obama
01-14-2010, 11:17 PM
Niccolino Locche, World Junior Welterweight Champion
Postscript: Smoked cigarettes throughout his career and still lived until the age of 70. That’s called winning.

or

Oscar Bonavena, Heavyweight contender
Was shot and killed outside a whorehouse near Reno, Nevada in 1976

of course I am being sarcastic, but I would take the whorehouse...

Problem is Bonavena died at less than half of Locche's age. Bonavena didn't even retire yet and was on a 7 fight winning streak.

imported_Ningy
01-15-2010, 12:07 AM
I'm talking post climax, OBAMA... He went out on top, literally! :)

Obama
01-15-2010, 12:24 AM
I'm talking post climax, OBAMA... He went out on top, literally! :)

But is it better for a big climax early or a small one late is the real question. :P

imported_Ningy
01-15-2010, 12:32 AM
Are you kidding me... I'm a man... Of course, it's big and quick... Get in, get out... What was her name? :)

ecto55
03-26-2010, 08:02 AM
No Eduardo Lausse??- thaty guy was seriously dangerous and deserves to be in any big punchers list, let alone greatest Aregnitian fighters list. Although he didnt win a world title, the fighters he did beat put him above a eg. Jorge Castro IMO.

Obama
03-26-2010, 11:19 AM
No Eduardo Lausse??- thaty guy was seriously dangerous and deserves to be in any big punchers list, let alone greatest Aregnitian fighters list. Although he didnt win a world title, the fighters he did beat put him above a eg. Jorge Castro IMO.

It's definitely not the best list in the world, doesn't even have Julio Cesar Vasquez on it. The guy who wrote it is no expert, but sadly is easily the most knowledgeable writer on ringtv.com. Worst part of the list for me is he spelled like 2-3 of the guys names wrong...

Anyways Lausse had a great run from '52 to '56, beating 3 of the better names on Sugar Ray Robinson's resume, one of which Robinson never beat (Ralph Tiger Jones). The other two were Gene Fullmer and Kid Gavilan, granted Gavilan was no great Middleweight and Robinson beat him at Welterweight. Joe Rindone is also another solid victory they share in common, but not one great in name value.